Featured Blog: Sperm Accumulation in the Stallion

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July 07, 2014

Posted by Dr. Ed Squires and Dr. Pat McCue in Stallion Management

Sperm Accumulators_Sperm Photo cropped Have you ever wondered what happens to all those sperm the stallion produces every day (5 billion or more)? If he is not bred or collected then where do the sperm go? We know that sperm are produced in the testicle and move from the testicle into the efferent ducts and then into the head of the epididymis. It takes about 7-10 days for sperm to travel from the head of the epididymis to the cauda epididymis (tail; figure middle right). This time frame is not altered by how often the stallion ejaculates. The old wives tale that you can get immature sperm if the stallion is bred too often is just not true.

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Retained Placenta in the Mare

June 02, 2014

Posted by Dr. Igor Canisso in Mare Management

Retained placenta (also known as retained fetal membranes) is the most common post-partum complication in mares. Typically, expulsion of the placenta occurs shortly after birth and it is considered retained if it is not expelled within 3 hours post-partum. The prevalence of retained placenta varies from 2 to 10% of foalings and can be as high as 30 -54% of uneventful births in Friesian mares. Retention of the placenta in mares should not be overlooked. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment should be quickly applied to prevent secondary, life threatening, complications.

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Splitting Doses of Frozen Semen

May 06, 2014

Posted by Paul Loomis in Breeding With Frozen Semen

“I just purchased one very expensive dose of frozen semen from this incredible stallion. Is it OK to split the dose and breed two mares to try and get two foals?” or “The stallion owner only provides one dose per heat cycle and my vet would like to use a timed insemination protocol. Is it OK to split the dose and inseminate twice on the heat cycle?” At SBS we have heard these questions or some variation of them many times over the years. The answers are not simple ones. This blog article will follow up on two previous blogs that are also important in understanding the issue. See the recent blogs What Exactly is a Dose of Frozen Semen? and What is Progressive Motility?

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Placentitis in the Mare - Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment

April 01, 2014

Posted by Dr. Karen Wolfsdorf in Mare Management

Placentitis, an inflammation of the placenta usually caused by an infectious agent, has emerged as a leading cause of reproductive loss in the equine breeding industry. This has a large economic and emotional impact when the pregnancy progresses until close to term but unfortunately ends in abortion or the birth of a small ill-thrifty foal. The placenta is composed of the amnion, which surrounds the fetus, and the chorio-allantois that attaches to the endometrium of the mare. These structures protect the fetus and provide gas and nutrient exchange allowing the foal to grow. When placentitis occurs it usually affects the chorioallantois compromising the foal because there is a loss of attachment of the placenta to the endometrium or the presence of infection and inflammation.

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Please Note - photos used in these news articles are available in the public domain, have been purchased through istockphoto or (when referencing breeders or horses) have been submitted to Select Breeders Services Inc. by the breeding farm or horse owner. Photo credit has been provided where applicable. If at anytime you see something that needs to be addressed please feel free to contact us directly.